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Soaring to Success - Where Everyone Matters

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We know you want to be a parent “in the know.” We want to be sure to communicate all of the terrific things happening at our school. We will update this page regularly, so please be sure to visit it often.

Minimize First Day Jitters

The start of the school year is an exciting and sometimes scary time for children. Not knowing what to expect that first day often leads to nervous stomachs and sleepless nights before the first day of school. Advance preparation can help relieve some of your child’s anxiety.

  • If possible, visit the school before the first day of school, either at a scheduled event or by appointment. Even if your child is a return student, it’s been a whole summer since he’s walked the halls, and a little refresher doesn’t hurt.
  • Talk about your child’s fears and expectations in the weeks before school starts. Recount some of your memories as a child. While it’s best to focus on the positive, a funny story or two about your past struggles could help put things in perspective too.
  • The week before school starts, work on getting back into a routine. Set your child’s alarm each morning, and have him get up and go through the school-morning rituals. This will help reset his body clock and get him ready to get moving in the morning.
  • Check out the school supply list, and make sure your child is prepared.
  • If you did not receive a school supply list ahead of time, ensure your child has pencils, a two-pocket folder, and a small spiral notebook for the first day of school. He’s sure to bring home a list of supplies after the first day.
  • Get everything ready the night before. Prepare your child’s lunch, set out backpacks and outfits, and decide what will be on the breakfast menu. Then, send your child to bed early. He’s sure to have trouble falling asleep, so some extra quiet time may help settle his nerves.
  • Get your child up a little early that first day to alleviate some of the stress of rushing through the morning routine. Leave the television off to ensure your child keeps moving.
  • After school, talk to your child. Kids are notorious for one-word answers, so ask open-ended questions that require a longer response. “Tell me what you did today.” “What is your teacher like?” and “What was the best part of your day?” are some great starters.

We hope your child is looking forward to his return to school. Some advance preparation is sure to help! Most of all, send him to school rested, prepared, and ready to tackle the year ahead.

Back to School Breakfast Ideas

"What's for breakfast?" is a question that can be heard throughout most homes in America. To some parents it can be a dreaded question; especially in the rush to get everyone out the door to school on time. We have heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, so what do we feed our kids for this ever important meal?   

Studies published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association and Nutrition Research Reviews have proven that children who eat a good breakfast perform better academically then those who don't.

Imagine your body is a machine; during the night your body depletes all the fuel your machine needs to keep running. Breakfast is the fuel to get your machine up and running again. 

Are all breakfasts created alike? No. The best combination for brain alertness and better learning is: a carbohydrate (whole grain variety) and a protein. A breakfast that is high in carbohydrates and low in protein (think sugary breakfast cereals) seems to decrease brain stimulation.   

Examples of a good breakfast are:

  • Yogurt with fruit and nuts
  • Whole grain toast topped with peanut butter and a glass of skim milk
  • Fruit salad with cottage cheese
  • Scrambled eggs with vegetables and cheese mixed in

You’ll find other examples at Kids Health.

If you find yourself running out the door late, here are some great breakfast ideas to go:

  • Trail mix of nuts, dried fruits, pretzels, and crackers
  • String cheese with whole wheat crackers
  • Single serving bowls of whole grain cereal

For additional ideas, check out the online sites:

Finally, according to Kids Health, kids who eat breakfast do better in school, are more likely to participate in physical activities, and tend to eat healthier overall. So, when your children ask "What's for breakfast?" you can answer confidently with a variety of options to help them perform better in school.

Queen Creek Elementary
23636 South 204th Street
Queen Creek, AZ 85142
Phone: (480) 987.5920
Attendance Line: (480) 987.5926
Fax: (480) 987.0612
Soaring to Success - Where Everyone Matters